Powering Net Zero Commitments

Our Graduates Know Net Zero

Be Recognised and Learn Best Practice Carbon Accounting and Net Zero Transition

GHG Management Certificate Program

Advance your career with this self-paced, digital program that equips you with sought-after skills to champion carbon accounting and Net Zero initiatives within any organisation

Crafted for consultants, managers, decision-makers and anyone interested to learn best practice;

Key Highlights

Global Standard Alignment:

Meet expectations. Adheres to the GHG Protocol for credible climate accounting and reporting worldwide.

In-Demand Expertise:

Prepares you for a future-proof career in environmental best practices.

Practical Application

Focuses on real-world, in-demand integration of GHG management into business processes.

Autonomous Learning

Empowers you with the skills needed to lead without external dependencies at your own pace.

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Our Commitments

We are a proud Participant in the UN Global Compact group of companies.

Our Business Policies reflect our commitment to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and Framework Convention on Climate Change.

The GHG Management Certificate Program is primarily based on the GHG Protocol and the ISO 14064 Standard, the World’s leading borderless Carbon Accounting and reporting standards

Valued Clients and Partners

Stand out with a Certificate in GHG Management

Get valuable in-demand skills

Two-thirds of commercial tenders now include weighting around verifiable climate action.

Implementing carbon emissions management to a globally accepted standard gives businesses credibility and a significant competitive advantage.

Businesses must upskill or outsource their GHG Management capabilities to stay relevant. You can help them.

Gain competitive advantage

Our promise

End-to-end Training

The GHG Management Program is designed to prepare and confidently take students through the 8 key steps

of completing a best-practice GHG Inventory Management Plan (IMP).

Key Takeouts

  • Carbon accounting foundations, standards, methodology and best practice tools

  • Define boundaries, undertake and report on a fictional organisation's emissions profile

  • Decarbonisation objectives. Target setting. Net Zero transition. Carbon offsetting

  • Complete GHG Inventory Managment Plan

  • Verification and Quality Manangement

Course Program FAQ

Earning the GHG Management Certificate demonstrates to employers and colleagues that you have a comprehensive understanding of GHG management practices and are committed to advancing your professional knowledge and skills. In addition, the GHG Management Certificate is recognised as a mark of excellence in the field of sustainability and GHG management.

By completing this program, you will gain the necessary knowledge and skills to help an organisation define, undertake, and report its emissions inventory in accordance with best practice standards.

You will also learn how to prepare and complete a comprehensive GHG Inventory Management Plan from end-to-end, collect relevant emissions data, and scientifically calculate GHG Emissions using best practice tools.

You will gain an understanding of and be able to apply the GHG Protocol, the global carbon accounting standard to report and disclose emissions, define the scope of and scientifically build an organisation’s Greenhouse Gas emissions profile, identify key emissions reduction opportunities, evaluate opportunities using your emissions baseline, set an organization’s net zero emissions and interim reduction targets, and communicate net zero emissions commitment and actions to stakeholders.  

Additionally, you will learn about best practise Quality Management systems in incrementally improving the quality of emissions data as well as verification and assurance options.

You will also learn how to qualify, select and source carbon offsetting projects.

This course is ideal for consultants, managers, and anyone interested in taking an active role in, or gaining a robust understanding of best practice GHG Inventory Management.

This course relates to current and future consultants, managers and anyone interested in, or looking to taking an active role in, or gaining robust understanding of, best practice GHG Inventory Management.

Whether you work or intend to work in the private sector, public sector, or non-profit sector, this course is designed to provide you with the knowledge and skills you need to manage GHG emission inventories effectively to a globally recognised standard.

The GHG Management Certificate is an online, self-paced, on-demand program delivered through 20+ video lectures with an average length of approximately 15 minutes.

Presenter’s notes are  available for reference. Each step is followed by an interactive skill quiz which requires an 80% pass rate. Re-attempts are allowed.

The open book online capstone assignment is completed incrementally with each study section and is integrated into the course work. The assignment is not a marked test but acts as a mutual verification that you have successfully navigated all required steps and have demonstrated proficiency in completing a robust GHG Inventory Management Plan for a fictional company.

This program follows the same steps and training as a corporate client of Carbon 360®, with the main difference being that you will be provided with a fictional organisation and given information to be applied through the various steps as if you worked on this fictional company.

The course is designed to be normally completed over a period of 4-8 weeks, with an estimated total of 40 hours of online learning, including the online capstone assignment. This allows participants to learn at their own pace and to balance their studies with their work and personal commitments. Students have 12 months to complete the program. 

How Carbon 360® works is explained here

The course covers a wide range of topics related to GHG management, including carbon accounting, emissions reduction strategies, reporting frameworks, and industry-specific guidance.

By the end of the course, participants will have gained a comprehensive understanding of GHG management practices, including carbon accounting, emissions reduction strategies, and reporting frameworks. They will also be able to apply this knowledge to real-world situations, and to develop and implement effective GHG management plans and strategies.

Specifically,

  • Help an organisation define, undertake and report their emissions inventory in accordance with the GHG Protocol and the Paris Climate Agreement (Scope 1-3 emissions)
  • Complete a comprehensive GHG Inventory Management Plan from end-to-end
  • Collect relevant emissions data
  • Scientifically calculate GHG Emissions using best practice tools
  • Understand and apply the GHG Protocol, the global carbon accounting standard to report and disclose emissions
  • Define the scope of and scientifically build an organisation’s Greenhouse Gas emissions profile
  • Identify key emissions reduction opportunities
  • Evaluate opportunities using your emissions baseline
  • Set an organisation’s net zero emissions and interim reduction targets
  • Communicate net zero emissions commitment and actions to stakeholders
  • Select and qualify carbon offsetting projects
  • Explain and structure a GHG Quality Management System.
  • Understand the value and purpose of internal and external verification and assurance options

The GHG Management Certificate program is based on the GHG Protocol framework with the objective of saving you hundreds of hours researching the applicable standards and being taught its relevance and how to apply it in a real-life scenario.

Carbon 360® uniquely includes access to the Carbon 360® Navigator, a powerful digital tool that works like a Swiss army knife to process collected raw emissions data that need to be converted into meaningful carbon dioxide equivalents required to scientifically calculate Scope 1-3 emissions.

The program focuses on guiding each student to confidently complete an end-to-end GHG Inventory Management Plan. As such, the program includes access to a cloud-based Inventory Management Plan application, ‘IMP,’ which is purposefully designed to align with the GHG Protocol expectations. The IMP supports you step by step in completing a fictional GHG Inventory Management Plan for a fictional company.

The GHG Management Certificate program requires basic computer knowledge, a decent internet connection, and a working knowledge of and access to Microsoft Excel. As the program is delivered online with tutorial support on-demand, it requires that you proactively progress through each step without being prompted.

All content is delivered in English.

While the program is designed to work on mobile devices, the best experience will be achieved on a desktop computer.

You will have access to the Carbon 360® Resource Area for 12 months and will need to undertake the program within this timeframe.

       FAQ here.

E-Learning Compliance

The GHG Management Certificate Program has been designed in observation of the ISO/IEC 24751 e-learning guidelines.

Benefits of the GHG Management Certificate

Earning the GHG Management Certificate demonstrates to employers and colleagues that you have a comprehensive understanding of GHG emissions inventory management practices and skills.

 

The program covers a wide range of topical areas related to GHG management, including carbon accounting, emissions reduction strategies, reporting frameworks and Net Zero transitions.

Gain Green Credential

Employers are increasingly valuing green credentials. Green credentials add credibility to what you know and who you are.

Support a Career in Sustainability

The world economy is adopting Nero Zero and millions of companies need help to build their inventory management capacity.

Demonstrate Net Zero Competence

Shows the World you have the skills to participate in the transition towards a low-carbon economy.

Obtain Sought After Knowledge

Your knowledge is valued and compared with others. Be confident you have relevant skills to be attractive and relevant.

Know! Don't Guess

Participate, anticipate, influence, advise, support, manage and govern. Emissions management is an executive-level priority.

Grow your Excellence

Maximise your opportunities. Be ready when others are not. Make sustainability part of who you are also professionally.

Be Valuable and Respected

Equips you to be valuable to businesses and to our community. Set a good example for others.

Be Relevant

Businesses and organisations that are looking to demonstrate positive climate action need guidance, support and direction.

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol provides the world's most widely used greenhouse gas accounting standards for companies.

This makes our Certificate Program uniquely relevant

Access the Free Program Outline

Fill out the form for instant access to the Course Program.

Hello, it’s nice to e-meet you!

I’m Patrick, Co-founder of Paying.Green® and Carbon 360®. Your journey towards mastering GHG Management is not just about advancing your career — it’s about making a tangible contribution to our planet’s future. We’re in this together, combining expertise with passion to empower individuals and organisations during these pivotal times for our environment.

Explore the core of what we do and get to know the passionate team that stands with me. We put people at the forefront of our mission. If you have any questions or need guidance, don’t hesitate to reach out to us here. Learn more about us and our team here.

To your success,

Dr. Patrick Hillenbrand

Enrol Here

We work hard to create value within Carbon 360® and our GHG Management Certificate program. However, if you don’t find it to your expectations within 30 days we will refund the full program fee, no questions asked.

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some common questions answered. Course Program FAQ Here.
Have a question? Email us here.

The short answer is to help organisations develop and retain capacity for self-powered and globally recognised Greenhouse Gas inventory Management.

Carbon 360® trains, supports and empowers any business to implement decarbonisation in accordance with the GHG Protocol and ISO 14064 standards. The Carbon 360® platform is an open source solution which encourages  and empowers businesses to act, and do so on their own terms.

Climate action is not just directed towards statutory compliance or earning social license. Worldwide pressure is mounting on businesses to reduce their value chain emissions. Businesses are increasingly implementing pre-qualification requirements which requires their value chain partners to maintain credible climate action, decarbonise their operations and to report the emissions associated with the goods, products, services, etc they supply to businesses. 

Carbon 360® is a truly unique end-to-end, on demand and certification agnostic GHG Management and training platform true to the GHG Protocol and ISO 14064+, the global standards for mandatory GHG reporting in 40+ countries.

The GHG Protocol (Greenhouse Gas Protocol) is a standardised framework for quantifying, managing, and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It was developed by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) in 1998 as a voluntary tool for companies and governments to measure and report their GHG emissions.

The GHG Protocol consists of two main types of standards: the Corporate Standard and the Product Standard. The Corporate Standard is used to quantify and report a company’s GHG emissions, while the Product Standard is used to quantify and report the GHG emissions associated with the production, use, and disposal of a product.

The Corporate Standard is divided into three scopes: scope 1, scope 2, and scope 3. Scope 1 emissions are direct emissions from sources owned or controlled by the company, such as fossil fuel combustion in company-owned vehicles or boilers. Scope 2 emissions are indirect emissions from the generation of purchased electricity, steam, or heat that is used by the company. Scope 3 emissions are all other indirect emissions that are not included in scope 1 or scope 2, such as the GHG emissions associated with the transportation of goods or the disposal of waste.

The Product Standard is used to calculate the GHG emissions associated with a product’s entire life cycle, from raw material extraction to disposal. It is divided into three phases: material production, product manufacturing, and use. The Product Standard provides a consistent method for companies to compare the GHG emissions of different products and identify opportunities for reduction.

The GHG Protocol is widely recognised as the international standard for GHG accounting and reporting, and it is used by thousands of companies and governments around the world. It is supported by numerous organisations, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO).

One of the main benefits of the GHG Protocol is that it provides a transparent and consistent method for companies and governments to report their GHG emissions, which can help build trust and credibility with stakeholders. It also helps organisations identify and prioritise opportunities for GHG reduction, which can contribute to the transition to a low-carbon economy.

In addition to the GHG Protocol standards, the WRI and WBCSD also offer a range of tools and resources to help organisations implement the GHG Protocol, such as training programs and calculation tools.

Overall, the GHG Protocol is a valuable tool for measuring and reducing GHG emissions, and it plays a critical role in the global effort to combat climate change. It helps companies and governments understand and manage their GHG emissions and take action to reduce them, which is essential for building a more sustainable and low-carbon future.

Carbon Accounting is the process of measuring, quantifying, and reporting an organisation’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It involves calculating the amount of GHGs that are emitted by an organisation’s operations, such as energy use, transportation, and waste management, as well as the GHGs that are emitted as a result of the organisation’s products and services.

Carbon accounting is an important tool for organisations to understand and manage their GHG emissions, as it helps identify sources of emissions and opportunities for reduction. It also allows organisations to track their progress towards GHG reduction goals and report their emissions to stakeholders.

There are various approaches and methods for carbon accounting, including the GHG Protocol, which is a standardised framework for GHG accounting and reporting developed by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). The GHG Protocol consists of two main standards: the Corporate Standard and the Product Standard. The Corporate Standard is used to quantify and report a company’s GHG emissions, while the Product Standard is used to quantify and report the GHG emissions associated with the production, use, and disposal of a product.

In addition to the GHG Protocol, there are other methods and tools for carbon accounting, such as the Carbon Trust Standard and the ISO 14064 series of standards. These approaches provide guidance on how to measure, report, and verify GHG emissions in a consistent and transparent manner.

Carbon accounting is often used in conjunction with carbon offsetting, which is the process of reducing GHG emissions in one place to compensate for GHG emissions that are generated elsewhere. Carbon offsetting allows organisations to mitigate the GHG emissions that they are unable to reduce directly by funding GHG reduction projects, such as renewable energy or reforestation projects.

Carbon accounting and offsetting are important tools for addressing climate change and transitioning to a low-carbon economy. By understanding and managing their GHG emissions, organisations can take action to reduce their impact on the environment and contribute to the global effort to combat climate change.

GHG management is the process of identifying, measuring, and reducing an organisation’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It involves understanding the sources of GHG emissions within an organisation, setting GHG reduction goals, and implementing strategies and actions to achieve those goals.

GHG management is an important tool for addressing climate change and transitioning to a low-carbon economy. GHGs, such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, trap heat in the Earth’s atmosphere and contribute to global warming. Reducing GHG emissions can help mitigate the negative impacts of climate change, such as sea level rise, extreme weather events, and biodiversity loss.

There are various approaches and tools available for GHG management, including the GHG Protocol, which is a standardised framework for GHG accounting and reporting developed by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). The GHG Protocol consists of two main standards: the Corporate Standard and the Product Standard. The Corporate Standard is used to quantify and report a company’s GHG emissions, while the Product Standard is used to quantify and report the GHG emissions associated with the production, use, and disposal of a product.

In addition to the GHG Protocol, there are other methods and tools for GHG management, such as the Carbon Trust Standard and the ISO 14064 series of standards. These approaches provide guidance on how to measure, report, and verify GHG emissions in a consistent and transparent manner.

Effective GHG management requires the involvement of all levels of an organisation, from top management to individual employees. It also requires the support of key stakeholders, such as customers, investors, and regulators.

There are numerous benefits to GHG management, including cost savings, improved brand reputation, and compliance with regulatory requirements. By implementing GHG management strategies, organisations can reduce their environmental impact and contribute to the global effort to combat climate change.

Greenhouse gases (GHGs) are gases that are emitted into the atmosphere and trap heat, contributing to the greenhouse effect and global warming. The main GHGs are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O), which are emitted through human activities such as the burning of fossil fuels, agriculture, and waste management, as well as natural sources such as the decomposition of organic matter.

Carbon dioxide is the most prevalent GHG and is emitted through the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas, as well as through land use and land-use change, such as deforestation and urbanization. It is also produced by the decomposition of organic matter and is emitted by animals during respiration.

Methane is a potent GHG that is emitted through the decomposition of organic matter in landfills, agricultural activities, such as livestock farming and rice cultivation, and the extraction and transportation of fossil fuels. It is also emitted by wetlands and rice paddies.

Nitrous oxide is a GHG that is emitted through the use of nitrogen-based fertilizers in agriculture, the burning of fossil fuels, and the decomposition of organic matter in landfills and wetlands. It is also emitted by the use of nitric acid and the production of adipic acid, which is used to make nylon and other synthetic fibres.

GHGs trap heat in the Earth’s atmosphere, contributing to the greenhouse effect, which is the natural process by which the Earth’s atmosphere warms the planet. Without the greenhouse effect, the Earth’s surface would be too cold to support life. However, the concentration of GHGs in the atmosphere has increased significantly over the past century due to human activities, leading to an increase in global temperatures and the potential for negative impacts on the environment and human health.

Reducing GHG emissions is an important part of addressing climate change and transitioning to a low-carbon economy. There are various strategies for reducing GHG emissions, including increasing energy efficiency, transitioning to renewable energy sources, and implementing carbon pricing and cap-and-trade systems. By reducing GHG emissions, we can mitigate the negative impacts of climate change and build a more sustainable and liveable planet for future generations.

Carbon offsetting is the process of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in one place to compensate for GHG emissions that are generated elsewhere. It allows individuals and organisations to mitigate the GHG emissions that they are unable to reduce directly by funding GHG reduction projects, such as renewable energy or reforestation projects.

Carbon offsetting is often used as a tool for climate change mitigation and as a way for individuals and organisations to reduce their carbon footprint. It can be used to offset GHG emissions from activities such as air travel, driving, and energy use in buildings.

There are various types of carbon offset projects, including renewable energy projects, such as wind or solar power, and carbon sequestration projects, such as reforestation or soil carbon sequestration. Carbon offset projects are designed to reduce or remove GHGs from the atmosphere, either by replacing fossil fuels with clean energy sources or by storing carbon in vegetation or soils.

To be effective, carbon offset projects must be verifiable, permanent, and additional. Verifiable means that the GHG emissions reductions achieved by the project can be accurately measured and verified. Permanent means that the GHG emissions reductions achieved by the project will last for a long period of time. Additional means that the GHG emissions reductions achieved by the project would not have occurred without the funding provided by the carbon offset.

Carbon offsetting is often used in conjunction with carbon accounting, which is the process of measuring, quantifying, and reporting an organisation’s GHG emissions. Carbon accounting helps organisations understand their GHG emissions and identify opportunities for reduction, while carbon offsetting allows them to offset any remaining emissions that cannot be reduced directly.

There are various organisations and programs that offer carbon offsetting services, including carbon offset providers, brokers, and exchanges. These organisations help individuals and organisations purchase carbon offsets and support GHG reduction projects.

Overall, carbon offsetting is a tool that allows individuals and organisations to reduce their GHG emissions and contribute to the global effort to combat climate change. By offsetting their GHG emissions, they can mitigate their impact on the environment and support the transition to a low-carbon economy.

Greenhouse gas (GHG) reporting refers to the process of measuring, documenting, and disclosing GHG emissions from a particular source or organisation. GHG emissions are gases that trap heat in the Earth’s atmosphere, contributing to climate change. The main GHGs are carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, but there are many others. GHG reporting is an important tool for understanding and reducing GHG emissions, as it helps organisations and governments identify sources of emissions, track progress towards reducing emissions, and set reduction targets.

GHG reporting can be mandatory or voluntary. In many countries, GHG reporting is mandatory for large industrial facilities and power plants, as well as for certain sectors such as transportation and agriculture. These regulations may require organisations to report their GHG emissions on an annual basis, using standardised reporting protocols and procedures. GHG reporting may also be voluntary, meaning that organisations choose to report their emissions even if they are not required to do so by law. Voluntary GHG reporting can be a useful way for organisations to demonstrate their commitment to sustainability and to engage with stakeholders on climate-related issues.

There are several key elements to GHG reporting. First, organisations need to identify and measure their GHG emissions. This can involve collecting data on energy use, fuel consumption, and other activities that generate GHGs. Organisations may also need to use specialised software and tools to calculate their GHG emissions, based on factors such as the type and quantity of fuel used, the efficiency of equipment, and the GHG intensity of different activities.

Second, organisations need to report their GHG emissions using a standardised reporting framework, such as the GHG Protocol or the ISO 14064 standard. These frameworks provide guidelines and definitions for measuring and reporting GHG emissions, as well as for estimating and accounting for uncertainty in GHG measurements.

Third, organisations may need to verify or audit their GHG emissions data to ensure its accuracy and reliability. This can involve having an independent third party review and confirm the data, or it can involve using a recognised GHG verification or certification standard, such as the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) or the Carbon Trust Standard.

Finally, organisations may need to disclose or communicate their GHG emissions data to stakeholders, such as investors, customers, or the general public. This can involve publishing a GHG emissions report or making the data available online through a GHG reporting platform or registry. GHG reporting can also be used to set and track progress towards GHG reduction targets, such as those outlined in a company’s sustainability plan or a government’s climate action plan.

GHG reporting can have a number of benefits for organisations. It can help organisations understand and reduce their GHG emissions, which can in turn reduce their operating costs and improve their environmental performance. GHG reporting can also help organisations communicate their efforts to address climate change and engage with stakeholders on this issue. Finally, GHG reporting can help organisations build credibility and trust by providing transparent and accurate information about their GHG emissions.

What are the benefits with GHG Reporting?

Greenhouse gas (GHG) reporting is the process of quantifying, documenting, and disclosing an organisation’s GHG emissions. GHG reporting provides a number of benefits, including:

  1. Improved understanding of GHG emissions: GHG reporting helps organisations understand the sources of their GHG emissions and the impact of their operations on the environment. This understanding can help organisations identify and prioritize opportunities for GHG reduction.

  2. Stakeholder engagement: GHG reporting helps organisations engage with stakeholders, such as investors, customers, and regulators, by providing transparent and consistent information about their GHG emissions. This can build trust and credibility with stakeholders and enhance the organisation’s reputation.

  3. Compliance with regulatory requirements: Many jurisdictions have GHG reporting requirements, and GHG reporting can help organisations comply with these requirements and avoid potential fines or penalties.

  4. Improved decision-making: GHG reporting can provide valuable information for decision-making, such as identifying cost-effective GHG reduction opportunities or identifying areas where the organisation may be exposed to regulatory or reputational risks.

  5. Support for GHG reduction goals: GHG reporting can help organisations set and track progress towards GHG reduction goals, and it can provide a baseline for measuring the effectiveness of GHG reduction strategies.

  6. Cost savings: Implementing GHG reduction strategies can lead to cost savings, such as reduced energy consumption and waste management costs. GHG reporting can help organisations identify these opportunities and track the resulting cost savings.

Overall, GHG reporting is a valuable tool for organisations to understand and manage their GHG emissions and take action to reduce them. It helps organisations engage with stakeholders, comply with regulatory requirements, and support GHG reduction goals, which can contribute to the transition to a low-carbon economy.

A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic and comprehensive accounting of GHG emissions and removals from a specific source or organisation. GHG inventories are used to measure and track GHG emissions over time, and to identify opportunities for reducing or offsetting those emissions. GHG inventories can be conducted at various scales, including at the organisational, facility, sector, or national level.

There are several key elements to a GHG inventory. First, the inventory must define the scope and boundaries of the emissions being accounted for. This may include identifying the sources of GHG emissions, such as energy use, transportation, and industrial processes, as well as the time period and geographical area being covered by the inventory.

It is important to carefully define the scope and boundaries of a GHG inventory to ensure that all relevant emissions are accounted for and that the inventory is representative of the source or organisation being studied. For example, an organisational GHG inventory might include all GHG emissions from a company’s operations, such as energy use in facilities, business travel, and employee commuting. A facility GHG inventory might focus on GHG emissions from a specific industrial plant or facility, such as emissions from energy use, waste, and process emissions. A sector GHG inventory might cover GHG emissions from a specific sector of the economy, such as transportation or agriculture. And a national GHG inventory might include all GHG emissions from a country, including emissions from energy, industry, transportation, agriculture, and other sectors.

It is also important to define the time period and geographical area covered by the inventory. For example, an organisational GHG inventory might cover a specific calendar year or fiscal year, while a national GHG inventory might cover a longer time period, such as a decade or more. The geographical area covered by the inventory might be global, national, or regional, depending on the scope and purpose of the inventory.

Second, the inventory must measure and quantify the GHG emissions from the identified sources. This can involve collecting data on energy use, fuel consumption, and other activities that generate GHGs, and using specialized software and tools to calculate the GHG emissions based on factors such as the type and quantity of fuel used, the efficiency of equipment, and the GHG intensity of different activities.

For example, an organisational GHG inventory might include data on energy use in facilities, such as electricity, natural gas, and other fuels, as well as data on transportation emissions, such as fuel consumption for business travel and employee commuting. A facility GHG inventory might include data on energy use, process emissions, and waste management, as well as data on emissions from refrigerants and other GHG-emitting substances. A sector GHG inventory might include data on fuel consumption and emissions from specific types of vehicles or equipment, as well as data on emissions from agriculture and other land use activities. And a national GHG inventory might include data on all sources of GHG emissions within the country, such as energy, industry, transportation, agriculture, and waste.

Accurate measurement and quantification of GHG emissions is critical to the credibility and usefulness of a GHG inventory. It is important to use reliable data sources and to follow established measurement protocols and guidelines to ensure that the GHG emissions are accurately represented. This may involve using standardized emissions factors, such as those provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) or the GHG Protocol, or it may involve conducting on-site measurements or using other methods to directly measure GHG emissions.

Third, the inventory must report the GHG emissions using a standardized reporting framework, such as the GHG Protocol or the ISO 14064 standard.

Businesses have an important role to play in the transition to a low-carbon economy, and there are a number of best practice decarbonisation strategies that they can adopt in order to reduce their carbon emissions and contribute to global greenhouse gas reduction targets. These strategies can help businesses reduce their environmental impact, meet regulatory requirements, and improve their reputation and competitiveness.

One key strategy is the deployment of clean energy technologies. This can involve the use of renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, and hydroelectric power to generate electricity, heat, or power for transportation. Businesses can also consider investing in energy storage technologies, such as batteries or thermal storage, which can help to smooth out the intermittent nature of renewable energy and improve the reliability of the power supply.

Another important decarbonisation strategy is energy efficiency. This can involve measures such as insulating buildings, using energy-efficient appliances and lighting, and optimizing industrial processes to reduce energy waste. Energy efficiency improvements can help businesses reduce their energy consumption and lower their energy bills, as well as reduce their carbon emissions.

Businesses can also adopt sustainable practices, such as using low-carbon or carbon-neutral alternatives to traditional materials and products, and implementing waste reduction and recycling programs. This can help businesses reduce their environmental impact and save resources.

The electrification of business operations can also be an effective decarbonisation strategy. This can involve the use of electric vehicles (EVs) and electric equipment, as well as the electrification of industrial processes and equipment. Electrification can significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions, as electricity can be produced from clean energy sources such as renewables.

In addition to these strategies, businesses can also consider participating in carbon pricing mechanisms, such as carbon offset programs or cap-and-trade systems. These mechanisms can help businesses offset their carbon emissions by financing the removal of an equivalent amount of CO2 from the atmosphere, or by buying and selling emissions allowances.

Implementing decarbonisation strategies can have a number of benefits for businesses, including cost savings from energy efficiency improvements and the use of cleaner energy sources, as well as improved reputation and customer loyalty. However, the transition to a low-carbon economy will also pose challenges for businesses, such as the need for significant investment and the potential for regulatory changes. It is therefore important for businesses to carefully consider the costs and benefits of different decarbonisation strategies and to develop a plan that is tailored to their specific needs and resources.

Paying.Green® only acquires verified carbon credits certified by voluntary GHG Programs such as Verra or the Gold Standard. This means that the underlying carbon offset projects have already achieved a verified reduction in carbon emissions on which the individual carbon credits are based.

Paying.Green never speculates or trades in carbon credits. We retire carbon credits at the same time they are acquired to ensure that they are never traded again and are converted into carbon offsets. This is formally recognised through cancellation certificates. We are not over-the-counter (OTC) brokers that commercially trades carbon credits to the open market. We work with or have direct access to over 6,000 carbon offset projects and developers worldwide.

We follow a strict process for selecting carbon offset credits so ensure funds are invested wisely;

Carbon credit acquisition governance Paying.Green® has a clear and well-developed Carbon Credit Acquisition Policy which incorporates the best practice principles under the United Nations Framework Convention of Climate Change (‘UNFCCC’).

Acquisitions are managed by Senior management under Delegation of Authority from the Board of Directors. The acquisition of carbon credits is considered against our Carbon Credit Acquisition Policy which can be accessed here.

Investment Competence: In addition to rigid carbon credit acquisition governance, we also have experienced staff that undertake ongoing research into credible carbon offset projects across the world which are focussed on the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals and support the objectives of Paying.Green®.

We transparently display underlying carbon emission reduction projects on our website.

Learn more here.

Yes. Often in many ways. Here are some examples:

  1. The alternative of hiring climate consultants may cost an organisation well in excess of $50,000 just the first year.
  2. Not having access to the right tools and support will, at best, slow the organisation’s decarbonisation process down to the cost of lost opportunity and at worst deliver incorrect results and/or related costly outcomes.
  3. The value of confidence and competence around your organisation’s GHG Inventory will empower your organisation to make better decisions leading to better outcomes and performance.
  4. The value of building and retaining inhouse GHG Management capacity. These skills will increasingly be seen as a core skillset and competitive advantage.
  5. The value of earning a social license by committing to a decarbonisation transition.
  6. Value of meeting your value chain’s emission reporting expectations positions your organisations competitively.
  7. Reputational value.
  8. Carbon 360® delivers a step-by-step GHG Management solution designed to empower, assist and support any business also in their early stages of their decarbonisation journey.

Carbon 360® is an 8 step GHG Management training and reporting program. It is globally reaching end-to end GHG management solution for any business with the following main elements supporting your organisation from day 1.;

On demand training – A digital Learning Management System delivers GHG Management training over ca 30 sharp videos for your organisation’s team members for each of the 8 steps identified in the GHG inventory preparation and reporting process.

GHG Inventory Management Plan – A cloud based web application built for Carbon 360® and validated against the GHG Protocol which incrementally, and at your own pace, builds your GHG inventory Management and decarbonisation transition plan.

Carbon 360® Curriculum – 1,000s of pages of GHG Protocol, ISO 14064+ and IPCC standards condensed and practically illustrated over 8 Guides. This gives you direct and hands down guidance to all key matters without subscribing to or spending months of studying the standards.

Carbon 360® Navigator – Someone called it the mothership of all GHG calculator tools… in combination. It is all that and it also creates a detailed output report ( for any external validation).

Carbon 360® Non-profit Carbon Offsetting provides access to a non-profit carbon offsetting infrastructure which provides advice and saves you money.

Climate Connect™. Access to the Climate Connect™ registry which showcases your climate commitment to like-minded businesses around the world.

No. Think of Carbon 360® as your organisation’s virtual in-house carbon accountant and carbon accounting platform that enables and supports your GHG inventory bookkeeping processes and which enables and prepares your ‘financials and tax returns’ with regards to your GHG Inventory and decarbonisation transition.

An external assurance (i.e. audit) is normally done by a third-party and is dependent on your circumstances.

The GHG Protocol allows organisations the flexibility to self-assure but depending on your organisations circumstances it may wish to undertake a third-party assurer for validation purposes and for increased credibility.

  • Builds internal capacity to undertake compliant GHG reporting and decarbonisation transition.
  • Scientifically tracks and report Scope 1-3 emissions. This also offers a competitive advantage with the organisation’s value chain.
  • Access to continues training to your team in best practice GHG Management. If someone leaves your organisation Carbon 360® is immediately available to train the new team member.
  • Saves time and removes need for costly consultants.
  • Makes ‘bumper sticker’ commercial certifications
  • Avoids greenwashing and virtue signalling criticism
  • Provides access to science based tools, templates & ongoing support.
  • Delivers an end-to-end GHG management and reporting system that supports informed decision making.
  • Allows your business to be compliant with the GHG Protocol and ISO 14064 + standards and meet stakeholder expectations.
  • Builds social licence.
  • Self-paced, on demand.

The World Resources Institute, which stands behind the GHG Protocol, suspended their ‘Built on the GHG Protocol’ program a few years ago. If the WRI resumes this opportunity it is Paying.Green’s view that it is highly likely that Carbon 360® would be endorsed as it is exclusively designed to be 100% compliant of and in support of the GHG Protocol including its application and value to business.

The Paris Climate Agreement is a legally binding international treaty signed in 2015 by 195 countries, including the United States, with the goal of mitigating global warming and its negative impacts. The treaty aims to limit the increase in global average temperature to well below 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels, with a goal of limiting the increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

The Paris Agreement acknowledges that climate change is a global problem that requires a global solution, and it establishes a framework for countries to work together to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change. The agreement also acknowledges the importance of providing financial assistance to developing countries to help them transition to low-carbon economies and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Under the Paris Agreement, each country is required to submit a “nationally determined contribution” (NDC), which outlines the steps it will take to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. These NDCs are non-binding, meaning that countries are not legally required to achieve them, but they are encouraged to do so. The goal of the NDCs is to provide a transparent and accountable framework for countries to report on their efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

One of the key features of the Paris Agreement is its emphasis on the importance of transparency and accountability. Under the agreement, countries are required to report on their progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to the impacts of climate change. These reports are reviewed by a panel of experts to ensure that they are accurate and in line with the goals of the agreement.

The Paris Agreement also establishes a financial mechanism to provide developing countries with the financial resources they need to transition to low-carbon economies and adapt to the impacts of climate change. This includes the Green Climate Fund, which was established to provide financial assistance to developing countries to help them reduce greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

The Paris Agreement has been widely praised for its ambitious goals and its commitment to addressing the problem of global warming. However, it has also faced criticism for its lack of binding emissions targets and the lack of consequences for countries that fail to meet their NDCs. Some critics argue that the agreement does not go far enough to address the problem of global warming, and that more aggressive measures are needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the impacts of climate change.

Despite these criticisms, the Paris Agreement remains a key international effort to address the problem of global warming and its negative impacts. It has garnered broad support from the international community, and many countries have already taken significant steps to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change. As the world continues to grapple with the challenges of climate change, the Paris Agreement will remain an important part of the global effort to mitigate and adapt to these challenges.

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Carbon neutral refers to the idea that an organisation, event, or product has had no net carbon dioxide emissions, meaning that any emissions that were produced were offset by activities that removed an equivalent amount of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. This can be achieved through a variety of methods, such as purchasing carbon credits, investing in renewable energy projects, or implementing energy efficiency measures.

Net zero refers to the idea that an organisation, event, or product has had no net greenhouse gas emissions, including not just carbon dioxide but also other gases such as methane and nitrous oxide. Like carbon neutrality, this can be achieved through a combination of reducing emissions and offsetting any remaining emissions.

While both carbon neutral and net zero refer to the idea of balancing emissions and removals, there are some key differences between the two. Carbon neutral tends to focus specifically on carbon dioxide emissions, while net zero takes a more comprehensive approach by considering all greenhouse gases. Additionally, carbon neutral typically refers to a single point in time, such as an event or product’s lifecycle, while net zero is often used to describe a longer-term goal or target, such as an organisation’s emissions over a certain period of time.

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